Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience
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Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 1 Why things sound the way they do
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 51 The Ear 50
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 93 Periodicity and Pitch Perception 42
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 139 Hearing Speech 46
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 142 Speech as a Dynamic Stimulus 3
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 149 Categorical Perception of Speech Sounds 7
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 152 Subcortical Representations of Speech Sounds and Vocalizations 3
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 159 Cortical Areas Involved in Speech Processing 7
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 161 The Role of Auditory Cortex: Insights from Clinical Observations 2
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 164 Representation of Speech and Vocalizations in Primary Auditory Cortex 3
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 169 Processing of Speech and Vocalizations in Higher Order Cortical Fields 5
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 173 Visual Influences 4
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 177 Neural Basis of Sound Localization 4
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 223 Auditory Scene Analysis 46
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 223 The sound of birds singing in the trees, the rustling of leaves and branches, and the delicate patter of light rain on tin roofs are some of the sounds that help us to know our environment. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 223 We frequently encounter multiple sound sources that are active simultaneously or nearly simultaneously. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 223 All of the sound waves from these different sound sources are arrived at our ears all mixed together, we nevertheless somehow hear them separately. This, in a nutshell, is auditory scene analysis. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 223 Sounds emitted by each source reflect its distinctive properties. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 227 In discussing pitch, speech, space, we could describe the relevant parameters by the early auditory system . Is it the enhancement for pitch, measuring binaural disparities, or estimating notch frequencies for spatial hearing, estimating format frequencies of vowels, etc. 4
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 227 Fully integrated percept is most likely represented in cortex, often beyond the primary cortical fields. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 227 Reverse hierarchy theory posits the presence of multiple representation levels, and also the fact that consciously we tend to access the higher representation levels with their more ecological representation of the sensory input. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 233 At subcortical levels, responses reflect physical structure of the sound waveform. 6
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 233 Responses of neurons in audio cortex and association cortex levels may encode the results of earlier-level auditory analyses rather than merely reflect the physical structure of the sound spectrum at the eardrums. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 233 Simultaneous Segregation and Grouping 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 233 Included background objects are only partly visible and need to be completed; i.e., the missing fragments must be inferred, but the visual images of objects rarely mix. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 233 The additive mixing of sound waves is much more akin to the superposition of transparent layers. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 234 It is customary to start the consideration of the properties of sound emitted by sound sources in the natural world at the level of the auditory nerve representation. 1
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 234 The auditory nerve representation of sounds is in terms of the variation of energy in the peripheral, narrow frequency bands. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 234 We would expect that the frequency components coming from the same source would have common features i.e. the components of a periodic sound have a harmonic relationship, and all frequency complements belonging to the same sound source should start at the same time and possibly end that the same time. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 234 Frequency components from the same sound source might grow and decline in level together. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 234 It is reasonable to expect that the different frequency components of the natural sound might be linked in time and frequency, and more subtle groupings might also exist. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 234 The rules that specify how to select bits of sound that most likely belong together often referred to as gestalt rules, and recognition of the importance of gestalt psychology in framing the issues governing perception of complex shapes. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 234 Common onsets and common amplitude variations are akin to the common fate grouping principle in vision, according to which elements that move together in the space would be perceived as part of a single object. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 234 Gestalt rules should be seen as heuristics that work reasonably well in most cases and may have been implemented in neural mechanisms. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 234 Three grouping cues or acoustic gestalts (1) common onset, (2) harmonic structure, and the (3) common interaural time differences (a cue to the azmuth of a sound source). 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 269 Development, Learning, and Plasticity 35
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 269 During the development of the sensory system, the anatomical and functional organization of brain regions is shaped by experience during sensitive or critical periods of early postnatal life. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 269 The plasticity during sensitive periods helps to optimize brain circuits to an individual's sensory environment. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 270 Learning is a lifelong process with extensive plasticity in the adult brain. 1
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 270 The development of the auditory system is a complex, multistage process that begins in early embryonic life. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 270 The ectoderm gives rise to both neural tissue and skin. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 270 The otic placode: is induced to invaginate and fold up into a structure called the otocyst, from which the cochlear and the ganglion cells, the future auditory nerve, are formed. 0
Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 270 The external ear and the middle ear have different embryological origins from that of the inner ear. 0
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Schnupp, et.al., Auditory Neuroscience 295 Auditory Prostheses
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